Cambridge's leading amateur theatre production company

Established 1981

Pygmalion
by  George Bernard Shaw   directed by Suzanne Jones

The ADC Theatre, Cambridge, April 2007

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director
  16. Managing Director
  17. Managing Director
  18. Managing Director
  19. Managing Director
  20. Managing Director
  21. Managing Director
  22. Managing Director
  23. Managing Director
  24. Managing Director
  25. Managing Director
  26. Managing Director
  27. Managing Director
  28. Managing Director
  29. Managing Director
  30. Managing Director
  31. Managing Director
  32. Managing Director
  33. Managing Director
  34. Managing Director
  35. Managing Director
  36. Managing Director
  37. Managing Director
  38. Managing Director
  39. Managing Director
  40. Managing Director
  41. Managing Director
  42. Managing Director
  43. Managing Director
  44. Managing Director
  45. Managing Director
  46. Managing Director
  47. Managing Director
  48. Managing Director
  49. Managing Director
  50. Managing Director
  51. Managing Director
  52. Managing Director
  53. Managing Director
  54. Managing Director
  55. Managing Director
  56. Managing Director
  57. Managing Director
  58. Managing Director
  59. Managing Director
  60. Managing Director
  61. Managing Director
  62. Managing Director
  63. Managing Director

A Review of Pygmalion
by Julie Petrucci

Is there anyone out there who does not know the story of Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion?  The basic plot is that, for a bet, Professor Henry Higgins tutors the very Cockney Eliza Doolittle, not only in the refinement of speech, but also in the refinement of her manner. When the end result produces a very ladylike Eliza, the lessons learned become much more far reaching. The successful musical My Fair Lady was based on this Bernard Shaw classic.

Guy Holmes provided us with a supremely chauvinistic performance as Henry Higgins as he rode roughshod over poor Eliza and anyone else who came within his orbit: whilst at the same time extracting every ounce of comedy from the role by manner and tone.  Barry Brown - at his very best as Colonel Pickering - was the perfect foil for Higgins both embarrassed by him yet unable to resist egging him on to succeed with his challenge to turn Eliza (with whom he developed a convincingly fond relationship) into a duchess.   The only people who really understood Higgins were Mrs Pearce (nicely handled by Mandi Cattell) and his affectionately indulgent mother played with elegance by Brenda Cottis.
 
The comedy in the production was skilfully brought out particularly in the 'At Home Day' scene when the Eynesford-Hills came to call.  Mark Bak was excellent as the lovesick Freddy with the talented Hannah Smith showing her snobbish side as Clara.  They were led from the front by the ever-skilful Sally Marsh as Mrs Eynesford-Hill. 
Then the Doolittles were added to the mix with Colin Lawrence revelling in the role of Alfred Doolittle as he was dragged kicking and screaming to join the 'middle-classes' and Alexandra Fye doing a wonderful job as Eliza.  I found the Cockney accent rather hard to understand at the beginning but once the posh accent came through the performance grew.  A very impressive portrayal by this young up-and-coming actress.
 
This review would not be complete without complimenting the elegant set (by Tony Broscomb) and costumes (by Lyn Chatterton) which together with the lighting design (by Mark Easterfield) added more style: and it says much for a company when you have the likes of Lindsey McAuley and Angela Chatterton plus numerous other talented people willing to take on walk on or minor roles to help create a strong, polished production.

Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion was a good choice for Bawds and director Suzanne Jones is to be congratulated on a very imaginative production which proved to be a real crowd puller and rightly so.  The classic and stylish poster promised much and no one went away disappointed.