Cambridge's leading amateur theatre production company

Established 1981

The Woman in White
 by Wilkie Collins  adapted by Constance Cox   directed by Brenda Cottis

The ADC Theatre, Cambridge, March 2010

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director
  16. Managing Director
  17. Managing Director
  18. Managing Director
  19. Managing Director
  20. Managing Director
  21. Managing Director
  22. Managing Director
  23. Managing Director
  24. Managing Director
  25. Managing Director
  26. Managing Director
  27. Managing Director
  28. Managing Director
  29. Managing Director
  30. Managing Director
  31. Managing Director
  32. Managing Director
  33. Managing Director
  34. Managing Director
  35. Managing Director
  36. Managing Director
  37. Managing Director
  38. Managing Director
  39. Managing Director
  40. Managing Director
  41. Managing Director
  42. Managing Director
  43. Managing Director
  44. Managing Director
  45. Managing Director
  46. Managing Director
  47. Managing Director
  48. Managing Director
  49. Managing Director
  50. Managing Director
  51. Managing Director
  52. Managing Director
  53. Managing Director
  54. Managing Director
  55. Managing Director
  56. Managing Director
  57. Managing Director
  58. Managing Director
  59. Managing Director
  60. Managing Director
  61. Managing Director
  62. Managing Director
  63. Managing Director
  64. Managing Director
  65. Managing Director
  66. Managing Director
  67. Managing Director
  68. Managing Director

A Review of The Woman In White
by Julian Christopher

Wilkie Collins' atmospheric stories lend themselvesto adaptations for the stage, and Constance Cox is a past master of dramatising just such tales. The story centres around unhappy Laura Fairlie and the plot to deprive her of her fortune.  Being set in the 1860s, the play gives Bawds the opportunity to do what they excel in - costume drama.

The set, designed by Tony Broscomb was perfect and furniture and props run by Kate Crofts we exactly right. The whole piece had a lived in appeal. The costumes under the guiding hand of Judy Hanson were absolutely superb and Ed Hopkins' lighting atmospheric.

As is to be expected from Bawds' cast we had some fine performances. Liz Beeson as Mrs Vesey, the housekeeper, hit the right note of subservience with just the right amount of affection for her 'young ladies' and understandable impatience with her neurotic hypochondriac of an employer. Martin Ruddock was nicely unobtrusive as the long-suffering Louis, the valet. Alexandra Fye and Angelique Fronicke were very believable half-sisters. Miss Fye was called upon to play dual roles which, whilst commendable, I don't think she quite pulled off. Her voice is very distinctive and it would have been more believable if it had been possible for her to use a dialect for the frightened and dying 'Woman in White'; she was much more at home as the sweet and lovely Laura. As always though a good performance from Miss Fye as Laura Fairlie. Angelique Fronicke was excellent as the intelligent and down-to-earth Marion Halcombe. A strong confident performance from an actress with great stage presence.

Lightening the atmosphere we had an amusing performance from Hugh Mellor obviously revelling in the role of Frederick Fairlie the hypochondriac to end all hypochondriacs. Mr Mellor's amusing performance was more than matched by Ron Meadows as the kindly family solicitor, Mr Gilmore. Perhaps the hardest role fell to Scott Brindle as the artist Walter Hartwright, who comes to teach and then falls in love with, Laura. Hartwright is the link between the household and the Woman in White and through him most of the story unfolds, and Mr Brindle handled his role well. The plot escalates once Laura marries the seemingly charming Sir Percival Glyde, Nigel Walter, who is actually a manipulative gold- digger with a very large skeleton in the cupboard. Mr Walter's first night nerves surfaced once or twice but the role was well handled nevertheless. Barry Brown as the sinister Count Fosco was in his element. Unfortunately the first night audience found his performance amusing rather than sinister, whilst Cathy McCluskey's monosyllabic Countess Fosco was positively chilling. Sally Marsh completed the cast with a lovely cameo performance as Mrs Catherick, the uncaring mother of the woman in white.

This production was well paced and absorbing despite first night nerves surfacing now and then. I have never read the book, bit it is now top of my reading list. Congratulations to director Brenda Cottis and all concerned.